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Social Studies Teachers
Page Updated: October 06, 2017
Mr. Scott DeLong
Room 308
Ms. Elizabeth Hannon
Room 306
Mr. Nicholas Sander
Room 304
Mr. Joseph Tout
Room 307A
Mr. James Yadush
Room 307B

Courses Offered:
United States History II
Honors United States History II
United States History III
Honors United States History III
Civics: Government and Economics
Honors Civics: Government and Economics
World History
Honors World History
Advanced Placement United States History
Advanced Placement European History
Psychology
Honors Psychology
Sociology
Introduction to Economics
The Second World War

United States History II (15216)
Prerequisite: Required for Freshman students - Meets Daily - 1.0 Credit
United States History is the study of the social, economic, and political development of the United States and its people from the end Reconstruction to the end of World War II. Through the chronological study of American history and culture, the common ideals and values that give meaning to our national character can be appreciated. The evolution of the American people, their beliefs, and concern for individual human dignity and rights will be given emphasis so as to provide a historical perspective for future decisions.

Honors United States History II
Prerequisite: Completed Honors Application and a minimum of a 90% in previous social studies courses and 85% in English 8. - Meets Daily - 1.0 Credit
Honors United States History II is a fast-paced, in-depth survey course that will give the student a thorough understanding of the economic, political, and social development of the United States and its people from the end of the Reconstruction era to the conclusion of World War II. Through the chronological study of American history and culture, the common ideals and values that give meaning to our national character can be appreciated. The evolution of the American people, their beliefs, and concern for individual human dignity and rights will be given emphasis to provide a historical perspective for future decisions. This course is largely class discussion and lecture format. The use of primary source readings and other secondary essays will complement the main text.

This course will introduce the student to writing in a social studies course.

United States History III (15226)
Prerequisite: Required for Sophomore students - Meets Daily - 1.0 Credit
United States History III is the study of the social, economic, and political development of the United States and its people from the end of World War II to the historic election of Barack Obama as president. Through the chronological study of American history and culture, the common ideals and values that give meaning to our national character can be appreciated. The evolution of the American people, their beliefs, and concern for individual human dignity and rights will be given emphasis so as to provide a historical perspective for future decisions.

Honors United States History III (15228)
Prerequisite: Completed Honors Application and an average of 90% in previous social studies courses - Meets Daily - 1.0 Credit
This challenging course, designed for the student with an exceptional background and aptitude in American History, is especially recommended for those students who are planning to major in History in college. This college preparatory course provides an in-depth examination of American History from the end of World War II to the historic election of Donald Trump as president. The use of primary sources and other collateral readings will be emphasized.

Civics: Government and Economics (15246)
Prerequisite: None - Meets Daily - 1.0 Credit
Civics: Government and Economics is a survey course that will give the student a basic understanding of the functions and the services of democratic and economic systems. To facilitate such understanding, we will engage in a topical study of our economy and our government. First, we will define the meaning of American citizenship. Second, we will examine how our democratic system developed. Third, we will investigate the specific rights guaranteed to each citizen by our Constitution. Fourth, we will explain the election process and the party system. For the economics portion of the semester, we will examine our economy. The course will examine the basics of our economic system. Additionally, we will examine the role of money and banking in our American society. If time permits, the course will investigate the criminal and juvenile justice systems.

This course is a graduation requirement of all students.

Honors Civics: Government and Economics (15250)
Prerequisite: Completed Honors Application and 90% in high school social studies courses (85% in weighted course) - Meets Daily - 1.0 Credit
Honors Civics: Government and Economics is a fast-paced, in-depth survey course that will give the student a thorough understanding of the functions and the services of democratic and economic systems. This course is largely class discussion and lecture format. To facilitate such understanding, we will engage in a topical study of our economy and our government. First, we will define the meaning of American citizenship. Second, we will examine how our democratic system developed. Third, we will investigate the specific rights guaranteed to each citizen by our Constitution. Fourth, we will explain the election process and the party system. For the economics portion of the semester, we will examine our economy. The course will examine the basics of our economic system. Additionally, we will examine the role of money and banking in our American society. If time permits, the course will investigate the criminal and juvenile justice systems.

This is a writing intensive course.

World History (15236)
Prerequisite: Junior or Senior Only - US History II and US History III - Meets Daily - 1.0 Credit
World History is a comprehensive study of the culture, geography, and lasting effects of historical events on our world today. As a survey course, it will focus on four major eras in world history beginning with the Renaissance and ending in the modern era following the events of World War II. The geography of a nation can often determine the course of its history and the evolution of the culture of its people throughout time. Students will be able to clearly identify historical events which shaped the world they live in today, on a local and global scale. Through the chronological study of trade and interactions between groups, students will observe the global influence on our values, beliefs and rights as American citizens. The class will focus greatly on both lecture as well as in-depth class discussion. Students will be encouraged to discover for themselves the parallels between their lives and the lives of important figures throughout time.

*For Juniors and Seniors only. Students must have taken US History II and III prior to this class.

Honors World History (15239)
Prerequisite: Junior or Senior Only - 90% or above in US History II, III, and Civics: Government or an 85% in Honors US History II,III and Honors Civics: Government and completed application - Meets Daily - 1.0 Credit
Honors World History is a challenging, comprehensive study of the culture, geography, and lasting effects of historical events on our world today. As a survey course, it will focus on broad overarching topics throughout world history. It is based upon on four major eras in world history beginning with the Age of Exploration and ending in the modern era following the events of World War II. The geography of a nation can often determine the course of its history and the evolution of the culture of its people throughout time. Students will have the opportunity to analyze world events by focusing on causality and global consequences. Students will be able to understand the value of diplomacy among nations and endeavor to predict possible outcomes of diplomatic action based upon cultural, ethnic, and religious divides. Through the chronological study of trade and interactions between groups, students will observe the global influence on our values, beliefs and rights as American citizens. The class will focus greatly on both lecture as well as in-depth class discussion. Students will be encouraged to discover for themselves the parallels between their lives and the lives of important figures throughout time.

Advanced Placement United States History (15229)
Prerequisites: Students should be able to read a college-level textbook and write grammatically correct, complete sentences; Completed application; 90% in high school History classes, or 85% in honors history courses - Meets Daily - 1.0 Credit
The College Board’s Advanced Placement Program (AP) enables students to pursue college level studies while still in high school. AP US History focuses on developing students’ understanding of American History form approximately 1491 to the present. The course has students investigate the content of United States history for significant events, individuals, developments, and processes in nine historical periods, and develop and use the same thinking skills and methods (analyzing primary and secondary sources, making historical comparisons, chronological reasoning, and argumentation) employed by historians when they study the past. The course also provides seven themes (American and national identity; migration and settlement; politics and power; work, exchange, and technology; America in the world; geography and the environment; and culture and society) that students explore throughout the course in order to make connections among historical developments in different times and places.

AP United States History concludes with a college-level assessment developed and scored by college and university faculty as well as experienced AP teachers. AP Exams are an essential part of the AP experience, enabling students to demonstrate their mastery of college level coursework. Most four-year colleges and universities in the US and universities in more than 60 countries recognize AP in the admission process and grant students credit, placement, or both on the basis of successful AP Exam Scores.

AP US History is designed to be the equivalent of a two-semester introductory college or university course.

Advanced Placement European History (15240)
Prerequisite: 90% or higher in high school history courses; Completed application - Meets Daily - 1.0 Credit
AP European History focuses on developing students’ understanding of European history from approximately 1450 to the present. In this course, students will investigate the content of European history for significant events, individuals, developments, and processes in four historical periods, and develop and use the same thinking skills and methods (analyzing primary and secondary sources, making historical comparisons, chronological reasoning, and argumentation) employed by historians when they study the past. The course also provides five themes (interaction of Europe and the world; poverty and prosperity; objective knowledge and subjective visions; states and other institutions or power; and individual and society) that students explore throughout the course in order to make connections among historical developments in different times and places. This will be a challenging, college level course, culminating in the AP European History exam. Students interested in the course must be able to read and interpret a college-level textbook and possess the skills necessary to write according to academic standards. European History has similar prerequisites to Honors World History and counts towards students’ world history graduation requirement. United States History II and III are prerequisites.

Psychology
Prerequisite: Sophomore, Junior or Senior - Meets Daily - 1.0 Credit
Psychology is defined as the scientific study of behavior and mental processes. This Psychology course is designed to introduce students to major theories and concepts associated with the Introduction to Psychology. Key concepts such as major psychological schools, theorists, child and adolescent psychology will be identified. Students will also analyze psychological disorders as well as methods of treatment. Students will be given a broad overview of major terms associated with Psychology.

Honors Psychology (15254)
Prerequisite: 85% or higher in previous social studies class - Meets Daily - 1.0 Credit with optional enrollment for PITT Dual Enrollment credit
Honors Psychology will focus on the scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings. You will learn psychological facts, principles and phenomena within the various fields of Psychology. This course may also be taken for college credit through The University of Pittsburgh.
  • Students will think critically about the world of Psychology and their relationship to it.
  • Students will learn about Psychologists, their experiments and theories, over the past century.
  • Students will assess differing theories of Psychologists such as Psychoanalytic, Behavioral, Cognitive, Humanistic, Biological and they will explore socio-cultural perspectives.
  • Students will demonstrate an understanding of how Psychologists think and the ethical ways in which they test their hypotheses.
  • Students will be able to relate Psychological theories to current events, think critically and draw their own conclusions

Sociology (15248)
Prerequisite: Junior or Senior Only - Meets Daily - 1.0 Credit
Sociology is defined as the scientific study of groups of people. This Sociology course is designed to introduce students to major theories and concepts associated with the Introduction to Sociology. Key concepts such as the history of sociology, social structure, adolescence, adulthood, crime and deviance, and class systems will be identified. Students will gain an understanding of how the individual functions within different social settings. Students will be given a broad overview of major terms associated with Sociology.

Introduction to Economics (15252)
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Civics: Government & Economics - Meets Daily - 1.0 Credit
Introduction to Economics is an academically challenging elective that is recommended for any student planning to attend a four-year college or university or any student planning a post-high school career in economics or business. This course, which meets state and national standards, focuses on the study of economic behavior and decisions in a nation’s whole economy. Students will explore the importance or money, banking, and finance in our economic system, as well as topics such as economic growth, unemployment, inflation, taxes, government spending, the national debt, the Federal Reserve System, international trade, and globalization.

The Second World War (15230)
Prerequisite: Sophomore, Junior or Senior - Meets Daily - 1.0 Credit
This elective allows juniors or seniors to investigate and understand the causes, events, and effects of World War II. This epochal struggle transformed the world; its aftershocks continue after the passage of over half a century. The war will be studied from an American perspective, but will examine issues such as the rise of Fascism in Italy and Germany, the rise of militarism in Japan, the worldwide economic depression of the 1930's, the failure of collective security among the democratic powers in Europe, and the Holocaust. Although military strategy constitutes a key component of this course, other aspects will be investigated, including political, economic, and social issues. A special point of focus will be the American "home front," which underwent a significant transformation. A research paper, an interview and a book report are required. Selected documentaries will supplement the textbook and other collateral readings. This course will require a considerable amount of reading; it is important that the student have a good reading background and interest in the subject.